Greg Duncan

N.-D.-de-l'Ile-Perrot

White lines mean fines

Humans are creatures of habit and routine. We perform a variety of daily rituals that are based on practicality and ease, and we often resist change.  Especially when it’s forced on us.

Imagine my surprise to find a parking ticket on my car one early morning having parked it off and on each day directly in front of my house in Notre Dame de l’Ile Perrot for the past 13 years. This due to an established ritual of car juggling in and out of our driveway depending on the season and the ever- encroaching width of our cedar hedges along the driveway.  I suspect that this vehicular dance routine is the most common of suburban rituals.

Confounded, I looked down and around and suddenly noticed prominent white lines running along my side of the street it’s entire length.  Did the town paint these lines while I was sleeping? The mystery was solved quickly when I called town hall to “discuss” and was informed politely that indeed there were new parking regulations in place. “You live on a street designated as part of phase 2 of the plan to establish corridors actifs” and yes sir, notice to this regard was delivered to each residence affected by the plan.”

Subsequent Google research proved that sure enough, there had been notice given via the town newsletter in June 2012 and I’ll take this opportunity to congratulate them on issuing a bilingual newsletter where I found the following:

“Corridors de deplacements actifs or active travel corridors are intended to provide visual cues that narrow traffic lanes to reduce vehicle speed and enhance safety for pedestrians and cyclists. They connect existing paths along Blvd. Don Quichotte, Blvd. St- Joseph North and Blvd. Virginie Roy, and encourage non- motorized travel to destinations such as schools, parks and daycares.”

Nice, but there was no mention of new parking regulations and my photos document that any existing road signage is inadequately placed on my street.  Be warned, these new white lines are your visual cue.

Have you or visiting guests received a parking ticket on your street in the area due to these new white lines and active corridors?

FYI: I begrudgingly paid the ticket and have now severely trimmed back my hedges.

2 comments

  1. By Barry Rowland

    It seems to me that allowing parking at the side of the street would automatically narrow the traffic lanes thus reducing vehicle speed. This would solve two problems and cost less.

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